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Friday, April 3, 2015

ARTS, SCHMARTS! WHO NEEDS THE ARTS? Steven Ingersoll's Bay City "Arts District" Properties In Tax Forfeiture Foreclosure; Owes Nearly $40,000 In 2012, 2013 Property Taxes For Arts District, Other Properties

That crunching sound you heard late yesterday afternoon was the noise made by eight of Steven Ingersoll's "Arts District LLC" properties, and a Center Avenue home, officially entering the final phase of the property tax forfeiture/foreclosure process. 

In Michigan, real property tax delinquency involves a three-year forfeiture and foreclosure process. 

Parcels are forfeited to the county treasurers when the real property taxes are in the second year of delinquency. Real property taxes which remain unpaid as of March 31 in the third year of delinquency are foreclosed upon by the Foreclosing Governmental Unit (FGU), which is usually the county treasurer’s office. 

The FGU is responsible for inspecting forfeited property, providing due process notifications and subsequent disposition of the tax foreclosed property.

Here's how the process works:

Taxpayers pay their current year property taxes to their city, village or township. "Delinquent" taxes are turned over to the Office of the County Treasurer, and a 4% fee is added with a 1% per month interest rate, 12% per year, in March of that year. 


In the next year, the interest rate jumps to 1.5% retroactively, or 18% per year. In the third and final year of the process, you lose your rights to the property and it is offered at auction to recover the taxes, penalties and interest that are owed
 

Official Bay County Register of Deeds office records reveal the awful truth for Ingersoll's "Arts District":
But there's more!

You can also add the Sanford Green House (above) at 1501 Center Avenue in Bay City. With another $2,803.60 added to Ingersoll's tab,  he's now at $32,248.53! 

But wait, here's two more: 114. N. Jackson ($6,785.85) and 115 N. Jackson ($831.80). Where are we now? 

At $39,866.18...and counting!

Remember Gerald "Bark" Essex? 

Essex, known on the Bay City Academy job site as "Bark", was the crew foreman of Roy Bradley's restoration company, Lasting Impressions, for the Academy conversion project. 

Although Bradley was convicted on all four counts, Essex escaped justice and was found not guilty. 

As I reported on this blog last fall, Steve Ingersoll signed a quit claim deed on September 26, 2013 for 241 N. Farragut, deeding the "rights and interest" in the property to Essex exactly one week after he was arraigned (along with Roy Bradley) on four counts of illegally distributing and handling asbestos. However, Ingersoll didn't officially register the deed with Bay County until February 24, 2014.


On March 31, Ingersoll's Arts District (meaning Ingersoll) filed a "correcting deed" for the property—further clouding the issue of just who owes the outstanding tax debt.




So, are you still convinced he's a "philanthropist"...or just a common thief?



8 comments:

  1. It is pretty evident he belongs in prison and should never get out.

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  2. Where do the Ingersolls' manipulations, financial somersaults, and trying to get away with anything stop? If they worked that hard at being ethical, they could have made an honest living instead of all these deceptions. At least for Mr. Ingersoll, it should stop in his jail cell.

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  3. Does anyone think either of the Ingersoll's give any consideration to ethical? Best bet is the court revokes all the financial transactions. The lawyer can not claim lack of notice so his claims can be voided. The current transactions are out right fraud in the attempt to hide assets. Nice tax consequences facing parties involved and maybe some happy jail time fir conspiracy to defraud the government. This conviction and prison term could be just the beginning of a life behind bars for Mr and Mrs Ingersoll. It looks like he wants his wife in prison with him.

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  4. Or, maybe he just signed the "Quit Claim Deeds" himself? We just never know with him or her, do we? I agree that the court should revoke all the financial transactions and impose penalties. Maybe the Ingersolls would like to be front-page news again and on TV? :-)
    On the bright side, Mrs. Ingersoll can decorate and color coordinate her husband's prison cell, and then he can reciprocate and decorate hers? For therapy and maybe good behavior in prison, she could be allowed to decorate the prison cells of all the parties that they dragged into this mess?

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    Replies
    1. You are very funny. Decorate the cells?

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    2. Thank you! And maybe instead of Bradbury and Bradbury wallpaper, they can put "IVL and IVL" logos and some appropriate "Prison Package" welcome basket?

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    3. The prison package welcome basket is a 'scary' idea. Amusing. I do not suppose getting caught has been much fun.

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    4. My vote is thief.

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